A tropical depression forms in the Atlantic and is expected to develop into a category 1 hurricane | Hurricane Center

A tropical depression formed in the Atlantic early Thursday and is expected to develop into a Category 1 hurricane, forecasters said.

Update: Hurricane Danielle forms in the Atlantic

The system is expected to be named Danielle later today if it strengthens as expected into a tropical storm. It poses no immediate threat to the earth.

The depression is the first storm to form in the Atlantic Basin in more than a month. No named storms formed in August, which is only the third time since 1950.

3 systems in the Atlantic






Hurricane forecasters were tracking three systems early Thursday, Sept. 1, 2022. (Image via National Hurricane Center)


The system is one of three disturbances hurricane forecasters were tracking in the Atlantic early Thursday. The other two also have the potential to develop into tropical depressions this week.

It’s too early to tell if any of the disruptions could reach the Americas

The shaded area on the graph is where a storm could develop and is not a trajectory. The National Hurricane Center issues a track when a tropical depression is forming or about to form. The tracks show where the storm could go within five days.

The categories, in ascending order of strength, are tropical depression, tropical storm, and hurricane (categories 1 through 5). Systems are named when they develop into a tropical storm.

The Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean should be calm for the next 48 hours.

Here’s what to know about the tropics as of 7 a.m. Thursday from the National Hurricane Center.

Tropical depression in the Atlantic







Tropical Depression 8:00 a.m. September 1

picture via NOAA


The tropical depression was about 975 miles west of the Azores at 4 a.m. central and moving northeast at 2 mph.

There were 35 mph winds and strengthening is expected. It is expected to become a tropical storm later today.

It lays no immediate wires to land, and no coastal watch or warning was in effect Thursday morning.

Read the full review.

Disruption by the Leeward Islands







Atlantic Disruption 7:00 a.m. September 1

image via National Hurricane Center


Forecasters are tracking a disturbance several hundred kilometers east of the Leeward Islands.

Any further development of the system will lead to the formation of a tropical depression, they said.

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It is expected to move slowly northwest towards waters near the Leeward Islands.

It has an 80% chance of developing into at least one tropical depression within five days.

Disruption near the Cape Verde Islands







Cabo Disruption 7:00 a.m. September 1

image via National Hurricane Center


Forecasters are also watching for a disturbance northwest of the Cape Verde Islands.

The showers associated with it are poorly organized, forecasters say, but there is still a chance that a short-lived tropical depression will form within a day or two.

The system is expected to move over cooler waters by the weekend, limiting any further development.

The disturbance could bring heavy rains to parts of the Cape Verde Islands regardless of development, forecasters said.

The system has a 30% chance of developing into at least one tropical depression within five days.

See the full outlook.

Busiest time of the season

This is historically the busiest time of Atlantic hurricane season.

For the past 100 years, the tropics have been most active in August, September and October, with September 10 being the peak of the season, according to federal forecasters. About 80% of the systems that hit the Gulf Coast formed during this time, according to the National Weather Service in Slidell.







High hurricane season

For the past 100 years, the tropics have been most active in August, September and October, with Sept. 10 being the peak of Atlantic hurricane season, according to federal forecasters. (graphic via NOAA)


There have been three named storms so far this season – Alex, Bonnie and Colin.

Hurricane season ends on November 30, but storms can form at any time.

What to do now

Now is the time to review hurricane plans and ensure your property is ready for hurricane season.

Here are some tips from the National Weather Service on how to prepare for the season:

Don’t miss a storm update this hurricane season. Sign up for our free Hurricane Center newsletter.

Carlie Kollath Wells is a breaking news reporter at NOLA.com and The Times-Picayune.